Philanthropy? What does it mean?

Philanthropy? What does it mean?

Philanthropy - giving your money to those who need it most
Philanthropy is on the rise

If you have made lots of money on the stock market, in your business or even on the horses, what should you do with it? Invest it, spend it or give it away. If you give it away then you are a philanthropist. But what exactly does that mean?

The dictionary definition of philanthropy is

“the desire to promote the welfare of others, expressed especially by the generous donation of money to good causes”

The Sunday Times devised a ‘Giving List of 2016‘ to showcase the people who give a percentage of their worth to good causes and the list is growing. People are ranked according to the percentage of the money they give away in relation to the amount of money that person is worth or has earned. So in the UK, the number one philanthropist is Lord David Sainsbury (great-grandson to the founder of the supermarket chain). He is worth £220.5 million and has given away 40% of his family wealth. Sir Elton John at number 10 has given away 10% of his wealth.  Alisher Umanov (shareholder at Arsenal football club) worth £7580 million has given away £100 million which although is a huge amount is only equivalent to 1.41%.

The Queen ranks at number 166 giving only 0.3% of her wealth away. And Richard Branson was worse at number 173 giving away only 0.28%. There were also comparisons between sporting celebrities. Colin Montgomerie (golf) is worth £35 million and has given away £0.9 million whereas Andy Murray (tennis) who has £57 million has only given away £0.1 million.

Why should people give their money away?

Philanthropy - Giving your money away to those who need it most

This may seem unfair of me to be criticising people who are after all giving away their money. They earned it, why shouldn’t they keep it all or keep a lot of it. My question is how much do you need? And do you want to make a difference? Do you want to leave behind or start creating a philanthropic footprint? Something that makes a difference to others and will be remembered in history for ever.

As a follower on Twitter of the Gates Foundation (Bill and Melinda Gates) I see them give their money and time to raise awareness of many issues like poverty, education and medicine. The Polio vaccine that they fund through their foundation has saved 18,600 lives a day since 1990. The number of polio cases around the world is now just 36! They have almost eradicated polio. That is an amazing philanthropic footprint that they have created. Yes, they have the money and yes, they can’t spend it all but they are making a difference. They have a lot and obviously that helps. Bill Gates is worth $87 billion but has already given away $27 billion and pledged to give away at least half of all his worth.

Who is the most philanthropic person in the world?

Number one is Warren Buffet. A self-made billionaire who has joined the Giving Pledge. An idea created originally through talks between the Gates, Warren Buffet and other billionaires across the world to encourage the very rich to pledge to give away a considerable sum of their money. It was once thought of as common to talk about how much money one earned or had. Now the rich seem more open to discussing it, especially if it is measured in how you are helping others rather than how many Ferraris and houses you have. It can be no coincidence that the Sunday Times created this ‘Giving List’ on the back of the ‘Rich List’ that they do every year.

Warren Buffet has pledged to donate 99% of his wealth. His pledge says

“More than 99% of my wealth will go to philanthropy during my lifetime or at death. Measured by dollars, this commitment is large. In a comparative sense, though, many individuals give more to others every day. Millions of people who regularly contribute to churches, schools, and other organizations thereby relinquish the use of funds that would otherwise benefit their own families. The dollars these people drop into a collection plate or give to United Way mean forgone movies, dinners out, or other personal pleasures. In contrast, my family and I will give up nothing we need or want by fulfilling this 99% pledge.”

I love his honesty. Keeping 1% of his worth still enables him and his family to continue the lifestyle he wants. He goes on to say about how time is a more precious commodity to give up than money and how generous some people are with this. You must read the pledges these billionaires have written. It makes me optimistic for the future where wealth can be shared to benefit all not just the few.

What did philanthropy look like a hundred years ago

If you want to leave a philanthropic footprint behind you, then take inspiration from this list of philanthropists from years ago. This is compiled by the Beacon awards who highlight work in this area.

  1. Barney Hughes 1808-1878 (Belfast) Bernard Hughes worked as a bakers’ boy for 6 years and in 1870 was recognised as the cities’ leading baker. He was the owner of the largest baking enterprise in Ireland. His production supplied Belfast’s poorer population with much-needed cheap bread, particularly during the harsh years of the Great Famine. He gained the respect of the community as a municipal politician and industrial reformer, donating the ground for St Peter’s Cathedral.
  2. George Cadbury 1839 – 1922 (Birmingham) George Cadbury, son of the founder of the chocolate factory, was driven by a passion for social reform. He wanted to create clean and sanitary conditions for his workers in contrast to the reality of factories in Victorian Britain. He set new standards for living and working conditions and gave the Bourneville estate to the Bourneville Village Trust in 1901. The trust was founded to develop the local community and its surroundings.
  3. Sir Montague Maurice Burton 1885 – 1952 (Leeds) A Lithuanian immigrant with just £100 to his name, founded Burton, one of Britain’s largest clothing shop chains. He started a tailoring business with the philanthropic aim of clothing the entire male population in good quality, affordable suits. He enforced an unusually short working day for the time of 8 hours, and became one of the first to instill formal welfare provisions in the workplace, introducing food halls, leisure groups and activities such as theatre, dance and sports teams. The company works closely with Cancer Research UK funding research into bowel cancer. It has supported the Movember Prostate Charity Campaign with the ‘Burton’ moustache, modeled on the moustache of their founder.

So why do we celebrate eating pancakes?

 

Pancakes on plate
Pancakes on pancake day

I love pancakes. So having a day to celebrate them is my idea of heaven. But why do we?

Okay, so we’re not really celebrating pancakes. We are celebrating Shrove Tuesday or Mardi Gras (sometimes known as Fat Tuesday in America, Sweden and France) and Carnival Tuesday in Trinidad and Tobago.

The name Shrove Tuesday comes from ‘shrive’, meaning absolution for sins by doing penance. A bell was rung to call Christians to go to Confession, where they admitted their sins to a priest and asked for absolution.

In France, it is called ‘Fat Tuesday’ because of the ancient custom of parading a fat ox through Paris. The ox was to remind the people that they were not allowed to eat meat during Lent.

So why is it called Pancake Day?

Pancake day came about much later on as a way of using up all the fats and foods that would not be eaten during fasting. In America it is called ‘Fat Tuesday’ because people use up their ‘fatty foods’ before Lent.

I found this explanation of Pancake day in Denmark and how it has its roots in history.

“To the Dutch it is called “Vastenavond” or “Dikke Dinsdag”. It is celebrated in the southern regions of the Netherlands and marks the last day of a celebration called “carnaval”. After this celebration a time of cleansing is done. Traditionally, around the start of February there would be a feast. This was the last opportunity to eat well before a time of food shortage at the end of the winter. On what nowadays is called “Vastenavond” meaning “the days before fasting” everyone ate the remaining winter stores of butter, lard, and meat before it began to rot, as livestock was slaughtered in the previous November.

It can’t be a coincidence that Lent is timed to match these lean months, with fasting helping the remaining food last longer.

Celebrating before fasting

This tradition of celebrating and then fasting happens in religions across the world.

In Hinduism it is believed that many diseases and damages to one’s body come from harmful substances in the digestive system. Hence, by fasting, one can purify himself, put his body to rest, and become healthier. Buddhists believe that fasting shows their determination to stay away from selfish desires, save the planet and all living creatures, and control their own greed. Muslims feel the most important reason to fast is for muslims to cleanse their bodies to present themselves to God and forgiveness for all their sins. Jews believe fasting will help them focus and bring them closer to forgiveness.

And before there was religion, there was nature. Hunting, foraging and storing food occured without fridges and freezers. So it makes sense that fasting occurred around this time, towards the end of Winter ready for Spring and the new seasonal foods she brought.

There is a common theme here. Indulge before fasting. We eat up all the good foods and then limit what we eat for so many weeks afterwards. Now what does that remind you of? Oh yes, Christmas. We eat all the rich and decadent foods and then go on a diet in January. Indulge before fasting. You might not be religious but I’m sure you’ve done this.

Pancakes and traditions

Celebrating Pancake day is a really old tradition but I found some other interesting traditions for Pancake day.

In Ireland, Pancakes would be cooked on the stove, and the honour of tossing the first pancake would go to the eldest, unmarried daughter. If she was successful, she would be married within the year.

In Canada, objects with symbolic value are baked into the pancakes, such as coins, nails, wedding rings and buttons. The lucky one to find coins in their pancake will be rich, the finder of the ring will be the first married, the finder of the nail will become a carpenter and the finder of the button will be a seamstress or tailor.

Dating back as far as the 12th century, many towns throughout England used to hold traditional Shrove Tuesday football (‘Mob Football’) games. Some still do. For two hours, men and women take part in  a ruby type of scrum to claim the football. Streets are closed and shops are boarded up to minimise the damage. Anything goes, and the only rule is that the ball is not allowed to leave the town’s boundaries. When the time is up, the man with the football in his hands is declared the winner, and gets to keep the ball as a trophy.

World record pancakes

  1. The tallest stack of pancakes is 101.8 cm (213 pancakes) and was made by Center Parcs Sherwood Forest, UK on 8 February 2016. (Guinness Book of records)
  2. The most pancakes made in one hour by an individual is 1,127 by Erica Price in Kansas, USA, on 17 April 2016.
  3. The Co-operative Union Ltd based in Manchester, England, made a pancake measuring 15.01 m in diameter and 2.5 cm deep on August 13, 1994.
  4. The oldest pancake race happened in 1445. According to legend, when the church bells rang for Shrove Tuesday service, a housewife wasn’t finished grilling the cakes. Not wishing to ruin her pancakes, she ran to the church with pan in hand. In memory of this housewife, women in Buckinghamshire, UK compete every Shrove Tuesday in a 415-yard race in which they must carry a pancake in a skillet.
  5. The Guinness Book of World Records does not recognize pancake eating as a category, but at an event at The Pancake Parlour in Melbourne, Australia, Hayden wilson ate 80 pancakes in 17 minutes and 26 seconds. That’s about 2.5kg of pancakes in less than 20 minutes.
  6. The fastest flipper of a pancake is Brad Jolly, who holds the record for most tosses of a pancake in one minute. He did 140 flips in 60 seconds during an event in Sydney, Australia in 2012.
  7. Dominic Cuzzacrea tossed his pancake 9.47 metres in the air at the Walden Galleria Mall in New York, USA, in November 2010.
  8. An incredible team made and flipped 76,382 pancakes in 8 hours at Centennial Olympic Park, Atlanta, USA, back in May 2009. A total of 175 volunteers using 37 griddles cooked the pancakes and dished them out to approximately 20,000 people.

I won’t be making 76,382 pancakes tonight although it will probably feel like it. And if you are eating out here are some ideas happening around London. Happy Pancake Day everyone.

Why it’s good to be a woman-the rise of the ‘superwoman’!

It’s good to be a woman! Those are words I wasn’t sure I would ever say. For most of my life I have thought that it would have been better to have been a man.

Superwoman by clipart Panda
Superwoman!

 

Why? Mainly because they get to concentrate on one thing at a time. From the moment a man gets on the career ladder (and providing he doesn’t become a stay at home dad) he can pretty much concentrate on his job and his career. Women on the other hand tend to have to think of everything. Not only do they have jobs but they are predominately the main child provider, the payer of bills, the food shopper, the cook, the babysitter organiser, the holiday organiser, the schedule organiser when kids are sick, taking part in numerous clubs and attending gazillions of social activities and parties, the taxi driver, the nurse, the therapist and local community representative (e.g.. neighbour) and they’ve had to take a break in the middle of their career to have a family and get back on the career ladder afterwards.

But, as new scientific evidence has shown this week, there may be a reason for all of this. Women are indeed the stronger sex!

Continue reading Why it’s good to be a woman-the rise of the ‘superwoman’!

A christmas present – new children’s eBook to download

New children’s ebook to download to any tablet, iPad, phone or Kindle.

Only 99p/99c special introductory offer. Available from Amazon.co.uk and Amazon.com now. Read the synopsis below.

Secret in the Sea
The Secret in the Sea – children’s ebook

 

What’s the story about?

Hannah is just an ordinary girl with ordinary problems but with an extraordinary talent. When she plays the violin, something magical happens that changes Hannah’s life in a way she never knew possible. This chapter book captures the magic of the sea and the violin and is based on a true story.

Hannah loves her violin. Lost in the music, she can escape the problems of her parents divorce. She also likes to go to the Bay and dangle her feet in the water. One day she discovers something that will not only change her life but the lives of all the people who live around the Bay. The only thing is, she will have to make a commotion and be noticed and that’s not something Hannah is comfortable doing. She often hides behind friends or her violin but this time she can’t do that and if she wants to stop a building project which is about to start, she will have to do something and quickly. Will she have the courage? Will anyone listen? Will they come and hear her?

Continue reading A christmas present – new children’s eBook to download

The madness of Christmas shopping!

Christmas is definitely upon us along with all the madness that surrounds this time of year. But what does madness look like?

hey-who-s-the-designer-here-before-after-design-talk-oyxnog-clipart

Yes, that looks like me pulling my hair out when Christmas is around the corner and we have presents to buy. And not just any presents. I’m talking about ‘the one’. You know ‘the one’. The one present that up until two days ago was not on anyone’s radar and there were plenty of them in a variety of stores. Then yesterday happened. All of sudden anyone who’s anyone now wants one and you can’t find one on any shop shelf or online.

‘What was this item?’ I hear you cry.

Continue reading The madness of Christmas shopping!

The cold virus – facts about the rhinovirus and ways to prevent catching it.

Did you know that the most common cause of the cold is the rhinovirus? 

Rhinovirus

The rhinovirus – Wellcome Trust

  1. The rhinovirus (unlike its name) is very small. It is 1000 times smaller than a human cell.
  2. 1350 billion rhinoviruses can sit on a 1 pound or 1 euro coin.
  3. A cold virus is not alive. It comes to life by occupying another host.
  4. A cold virus survives best in cold, dry weather.
  5. You can’t catch a cold virus by kissing but you can by shaking hands!
  6. Viruses love eyes and noses.The yellow mucus sometimes produced from your nose during a cold is actually white blood cells.
  7. Cold viruses don’t make us feel ill. Our immune system response makes us feel unwell.
  8. The velocity of a sneeze is the same as a professional baseball pitcher, 150 km per hour. That’s fast!
  9. More children than adults catch colds ( not surprising when you see what children do when they sneeze!)
  10. Your race, gender, education and shape of your body does not make a difference whether you are more likely to catch a cold or not.

Continue reading The cold virus – facts about the rhinovirus and ways to prevent catching it.